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Dogs + Medications

  • Atovaquone (brand name Mepron®) is a drug used to treat infections caused by bacteria and protozoa. It is often combined with other drugs to treat specific infections. Side effects from atovaquone have not been reported; however, any side effects that you observe should be reported to your veterinarian. Any side effects that you observe should be reported to your veterinarian.

  • Azathioprine is an immune suppressing medication given by mouth or as an injection and is mainly used off label to treat immune-mediated diseases in dogs. Common side effects include gastrointestinal upset and bone marrow suppression. This medication should not be used in pets that are allergic to azathioprine or are pregnant. It should be used with caution in pets with liver or kidney disease. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Azithromycin is a broad-spectrum antibiotic used for a variety of bacterial, rickettsial, and parasitic infections in animals. It is often used in combination with atovaquone to treat babesiosis in dogs.

  • Azodyl® is a nutritional supplement that may decrease azotemia, a condition in which there is too much nitrogen (in the form of urea, creatinine, and other waste products) in the blood. Azotemia occurs in both dogs and cats that have chronic kidney disease (CKD). In theory, Azodyl® works by adding nitrogen-consuming bacteria into the intestines. Azodyl® should be considered an adjunct (secondary) treatment for CKD.

  • Benazepril is given by mouth and is used on and off label to treat heart failure, high blood pressure, chronic kidney disease, protein-losing glomerulonephropathies, and idiopathic kidney bleeding. Side effects may include vomiting, diarrhea, and lack of appetite. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or other ACE inhibitors. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Bethanechol chloride is given by mouth or injection and is used off label to increase urinary or intestinal movement/activity. Give this medication as directed by your veterinarian. Common side effects include vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, and lack of appetite. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it, or have urinary obstruction, stomach ulcers, gastrointestinal obstructions, intestinal inflammation, or recent intestinal, stomach, or bladder surgery. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Bilberry is an over the counter supplement given by mouth, and is used off label to treat conditions of the eyes, heart and blood vessels, diabetes, and tumors. Give as directed by your veterinarian. There are no known side effects, but information is limited. There are no known contraindications. Certain medications should be used with caution in combination with bilberry. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Bismuth compounds are given by mouth and are used on and off label to treat diarrhea and upset stomach. Give as directed by your veterinarian. The most common side effects include discolored stools and constipation. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or other NSAIDs, or in pets that have a stomach or intestinal ulcer. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Green and black tea is given by mouth, over the counter, and is used off label to treat cancers and inflammation. Give as directed by your veterinarian. The most common side effects of caffeinated green/black tea include nervousness, sleeplessness, increased heart rate, and anxiety. Based on human studies, green and black tea should be used cautiously in pets that have kidney disease, stomach or intestinal ulcers, heart disease, insomnia, glaucoma, or high blood pressure. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Bromides are given by mouth and are used off label to treat seizures in dogs. Common side effects include sleepiness, mild vomiting, restlessness, increased or decreased appetite, constipation, increased thirst, and increased urination. Do not use bromides in cats or in pets that are allergic to it. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.